Archives for posts with tag: bsd

Happy 20th Birthday FreeBSD!

Today marks the 20th birthday of Berkeley Software Distribution, the dissertation project of computer science visionary Bill Joy, and also the codebase for Apple’s OSX.

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Dragonfly BSD 3.4 was just released, and has DPorts, an aptitude-like package manager using FreeBSD’s ports as a base.

I may try it.

Following recent US laws which minimalize the security of social networking sites, I myself am setting up a deepnet server I can use to chat with my friends, and am making a guide on how to set one up. It’s fairly easy and can work with nearly any computer that has a steady internet connection.

1.) Install Linux or BSD

I have a guide on choosing a Linux distro here

you will not need xorg or a desktop manager for this, so unless you plan to use the device for other purposes I would suggest not installing a graphic interface for better security and speed.

2.) Install talk and OpenSSH

for Ubuntu/Debian/Mint: (these should be included, but if not:)

apt-get install openssh

apt-get install talk

for Mandriva/Fedora/OpenSUSE: (these should be included, but if not:)

yum install openssh

yum install talk

for Arch Linux:

pacman -S openssh talk

for others, google how to do it.

3.) Configure ssh

The default settings will work fine, but if you want even more enhanced security read this

Also make sure to log in to your router, and if necessary, your modem, and ensure port 22 is forwarded to the IP of the machine you are configuring this on (this is where 99% of ssh problems come from)

Your modem should forward 22 to your router, then your router should forward 22 to your machine.

4.) Learn to use talk

I unfortunately am not at my server right now and cannot provide screenshots or an in-depth guide on using talk, but it should be simple. For instructions and info on talk, type:

man talk

or

info talk

5.) Configure talk

Again, defaults should be fine, but you can mess with the settings for more security

6.) Connect peers to server with ssh

Make an account for each peer you wish to speak to privately on the machine (useradd on most systems), and have them log in with ssh (ssh -l username@IP)(note this is the IP of your modem, which can be found by typing “IP” into Google)

ssh is a tricky program to figure out for newer users, and I haven’t seen many good guides on it. If you need help, ask on various Linux channels on Freenode (I’ve found #Fedora and #Ubuntu the most helpful)

You can check who is connected with the command “who”

7.) Talk to your peers

the command will be “talk person tty”

on my machine, “who” returns:

[peaceblaster@ArchMobile ~]$ who
peaceblaster :0 2013-04-22 10:55 (:0)
peaceblaster pts/0 2013-04-23 05:10 (:0)
peaceblaster tty2 2013-04-23 05:39

so to message user “peaceblaster”, I would type:

talk peaceblaster tty2

Why this is secure:

Essentially what this does is use very old UNIX components from the 1980s, which were made long before Facebook or Twitter were even possible. Ssh allows secure, encrypted logins from anywhere in the world, which are then used to chat on the server you have set up. By hosting your own server, the only one who has access to any logs is you, so Facebook, Google or any social networking company can’t be forced to give out your information to anyone who pays them enough. Since you use a raw IP instead of a domain, the network is in the “deepnet” or “darknet”, outside of the visible section of the web people call “the internet”.

The other convenient aspect of this setup is that OpenSSH comes with the program “sftp”, which allows equally secure file transfer between machines. The command for sftp is similar to ssh:

sftp username@IP

This will open a shell with which you can send and receive files (there is more on the shell in the man page for sftp)

There you go, secure messaging and filesharing for you and your friends. If you are very paranoid you can look up guides on securing OpenSSH.

P.S.

I noticed most of my readers are not from English-speaking countries, so I have done my best to make this readable. I hope I have done well.

Minecraft in Arch Linux

Installing minecraft tomost GNU/Linux distros is easy and a million guides exist on how to do it, but for a more minimal distro like Arch Linux I thought it would be difficult.

I could not have been more wrong.

Nothing completely mindblowing like it being added to pacman happened, but they bothered to make an article in the wiki about it, and it was fairly straightforward.

Happy mining!

Will post again with any problems/fixes, and possibly about installing for FreeBSD

Hello, I heard you have a tech problem. Closely follow these instructions, and your problem will be solved.

Linux/BSD:

Try turning it off and on again

Windows:

Try turning it off and on again

Linux/BSD:

Check for updates that could fix it and report a bug if necessary

Windows:

Safe mode

Linux/BSD:

check your config files

Windows:

Safe mode harder

Linux/BSD:

Chroot in from an outside disc and fix whatever’s wrong

Windows:

Safe mode EVEN HARDER

Linux/BSD/Windows:

Reinstall OS. Quietly weep.

Vi or Emacs is an essential for those planning to use GNU/Linux or BSD for any length of time.

I used to think otherwise, but Vi has just such amazing commands, like movement between corresponding parenthesis, on-the-fly macros, and just more efficient control in general.

The “awkward” goes away instantly if you just pretend “command mode” is the same as holding down the CTRL key.

this is the best guide I’ve seen on Vi: http://yannesposito.com/Scratch/en/blog/Learn-Vim-Progressively/

Now have working ssh server for tunneling around internet restrictions, and encrypting traffic. Viva la revolucion!

Trying Xfce on FreeBSD, because Gnome and KDE are simply too big… not sure what to expect whatsoever.

It’s still taking forever and a day to compile though